Citations

Age

1 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2014.

2 Institute of Medicine. Public health implications of raising the minimum age of legal access to tobacco products. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 2015.

3 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Results from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration - Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality; September 2011.

4 Kessel Schneider S, Buka SL, Dash K, Winickoff JP, O'Donnell L. Community reductions in youth smoking after raising the minimum tobacco sales age to 21. Tob Control. 2015.

5 King BA, Jama AO, Marynak KL, Promoff GR. Attitudes Toward Raising the Minimum Age of Sale for Tobacco Among U.S. Adults. Am J Prev Med. 2015.

6 Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids. Increasing the Minimum Legal Sale Age for Tobacco Products to 21. https://www.tobaccofreekids.org/research/factsheets/pdf/0376.pdf.

Flavoring

1 Frank P. Kid’ Drinks. http://www.foodproductdesign.com/articles/2000/01/kids-drinks.aspx. Accessed February 26, 2015: Informa Exhibitions LLC; 2000.

2 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Bidi use among urban youth--Massachusetts, March-April 1999. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1999;48(36):796-799.

3 US DHHS, Office of Adolescent Health. Trends in Adolescent Tobacco Use. 2014; http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah/adolescent-health-topics/substance-abuse/tobacco/trends.html. 

4 Minnesota Department of Health. Teens and Tobacco in Minnesota, 2014 Update - Results from the Minnesota Youth Tobacco Survey. November 2014.

5 US DHHS, Food and Drug Administration. FDA Parental Advisory on Flavored Tobacco Products - What You Need To Know. 2013; http://www.fda.gov/TobaccoProducts/ProtectingKidsfromTobacco/FlavoredTobacco/ucm183196.htm. Accessed December 5, 2014.

6 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Results from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration - Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality; September 2011. 

7 Ritchy AP (RJR Tobacco). Apple Wine Cigarette Project. 1972; Available from: http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/tid/buq49d00/pdf.

Funding

1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs—2014. 2014.

2 Levy DT, et al. The role of public policies in reducing smoking: The Minnesota SimSmoke tobacco policy model. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2012.

3 ClearWay Minnesota, Minnesota Department of Health. Minnesota Adult Tobacco Survey: Tobacco Use in Minnesota: 2014 Update. Feb 2015.

4 Minnesota Department of Health, 2014 Minnesota Youth Tobacco Survey, Nov. 2014.

5 Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. A Broken Promise to Our Children. The 1998 State Tobacco Settlement 13 Years Later. 2014. http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/what_we_do/state_local/tobacco_settlement/

Price

1 Ragsdale, Jim. “Minnesota Poll shows support for DFL tax hikes.” Star Tribune Minneapolis. June 18, 2013.

2 Minnesota Department of Health, 2014 Minnesota Youth Tobacco Survey, Nov. 2014.

3 ClearWay Minnesota, Minnesota Department of Health. Minnesota Adult Tobacco Survey: Tobacco Use in Minnesota: 2014 Update. February 2015.

4 Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. New Revenues, Public Health Benefits & Cost Savings From a $1.50 Cigarette Tax Increase in Minnesota. Jan 2013. 

  • Outline of Minnesota

    Our Mission

    Minnesotans for a Smoke-Free Generation is a coalition of Minnesota organizations that share a common goal of saving Minnesota youth from a lifetime of addiction to tobacco. Each year in Minnesota tobacco use is responsible for more than 6,300 deaths and more than $3 billion in preventable health care costs and 95 percent of adult smokers started before the age of 21. The coalition supports policies that reduce youth smoking, including keeping tobacco prices high, raising the tobacco sale age to 21, limiting access to candy-, fruit- and menthol-flavored tobacco and funding future tobacco prevention programs.

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